Friday, June 29, 2007

Indian Pilots Get Their Hands on Indian Hawks

Just got this BAe release, with this photo:

Indian Air Force pilots have, for the first time, got their hands on the Hawk aircraft that will train the next generation of Indian pilots.

As part of the contract to supply a total training solution, which includes 66 Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer (AJT) aircraft, BAE Systems and the RAF will deliver a 'Convex Flying Programme' converting Indian Air Force (IAF) qualified flying instructors and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) test pilots onto the new Indian Hawk. Two courses of six IAF flying instructors will undergo training on the Indian Hawk between June and September this year.

Once the first Hawks have been delivered to the Indian Air Force later this year, these instructors will be responsible for training pilots who will be the IAF's frontline pilots.

The first stage of the programme is ground school training, carried out at RAF Valley by BAE Systems specialists. The IAF instructors will also carry out five UK orientation simulator sorties on the Hawk Synthetic Training Facility (HSTF) located at the RAF base, delivered in partnership by BAE Systems and the RAF.

Following this stage the instructors return to the BAE Systems Warton site to carry out sea survival training and the BAE Systems Brough site for avionics training before commencing their flying training at Warton. Each IAF instructor will fly 15 training sorties on the new Indian Hawks before qualifying.

Rod Harrison, Hawk India Flying Training Manager, said: "We have been training 75 IAF student pilots throughout the course of the India Interim Flying Training programme, which concludes in May 2008. These pilots have been training on the RAF TMk1 Hawks. This next stage of flying training sees experienced instructors introduced to their new Indian Hawk AJTs.

"It's an exciting step forward for the pilots and by training on the world's leading advanced jet trainer the pilots couldn't be better prepared for frontline aircraft."

Three aircraft are being used in the training programme out of the 66 new Hawk Advanced Jet Trainers for the IAF. The first 24 aircraft are being built at BAE Systems' facilities in Brough, East Yorkshire, with flight-testing taking place at Warton in Lancashire. The remaining 42 aircraft are being manufactured under licence in India through a partnership with India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, based in Bangalore.
Indian Air Force pilots have, for the first time, got their hands on the Hawk aircraft that will train the next generation of Indian pilots.

As part of the contract to supply a total training solution, which includes 66 Hawk Advanced Jet Trainer (AJT) aircraft, BAE Systems and the RAF will deliver a 'Convex Flying Programme' converting Indian Air Force (IAF) qualified flying instructors and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) test pilots onto the new Indian Hawk. Two courses of six IAF flying instructors will undergo training on the Indian Hawk between June and September this year.

Once the first Hawks have been delivered to the Indian Air Force later this year, these instructors will be responsible for training pilots who will be the IAF's frontline pilots.

The first stage of the programme is ground school training, carried out at RAF Valley by BAE Systems specialists. The IAF instructors will also carry out five UK orientation simulator sorties on the Hawk Synthetic Training Facility (HSTF) located at the RAF base, delivered in partnership by BAE Systems and the RAF.

Following this stage the instructors return to the BAE Systems Warton site to carry out sea survival training and the BAE Systems Brough site for avionics training before commencing their flying training at Warton. Each IAF instructor will fly 15 training sorties on the new Indian Hawks before qualifying.

Rod Harrison, Hawk India Flying Training Manager, said: "We have been training 75 IAF student pilots throughout the course of the India Interim Flying Training programme, which concludes in May 2008. These pilots have been training on the RAF TMk1 Hawks. This next stage of flying training sees experienced instructors introduced to their new Indian Hawk AJTs.

"It's an exciting step forward for the pilots and by training on the world's leading advanced jet trainer the pilots couldn't be better prepared for frontline aircraft."

Three aircraft are being used in the training programme out of the 66 new Hawk Advanced Jet Trainers for the IAF. The first 24 aircraft are being built at BAE Systems' facilities in Brough, East Yorkshire, with flight-testing taking place at Warton in Lancashire. The remaining 42 aircraft are being manufactured under licence in India through a partnership with India's Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, based in Bangalore.

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