Friday, December 17, 2010

IAF Takes Delivery Of First C-130J, Arrives In India Before New Year

[Lockeed-Martin Press Release] At ceremonies today here (Marietta, Georgia), Lockheed Martin delivered the first of six C-130Js for the Indian Air Force. The new fleet was ordered under a $1.2 billion U.S. Foreign Military Sale (India’s first) in late 2008.

“There are few mottos that impart such passion as that of the Indian Air Force, which is ‘Touch the Sky With Glory’,” said Lorraine Martin, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for C-130 Programs, during today’s ceremony. “Today begins a new glorious, enduring partnership with India as the fourth largest air force in the world proudly joins the worldwide C-130 family.”

This is India’s first experience with the C-130 so the package being provided by the U.S. government is comprehensive. The contact includes six aircraft, training of aircrew and maintenance technicians, spares, ground support and test equipment, servicing carts, forklifts, loading vehicles, cargo pallets and a team of technical specialists who will be based in India during a three year initial support period. Also included in the package is India-unique operational equipment designed to increase Special Operations capabilities. The first two C-130Js will be flown to India early next year and will be followed by the remaining four aircraft deliveries in 2011. India’s new airlift fleet will be based at Hindon Air Force Station.

The Indian Air Force’s C-130J Super Hercules is a highly integrated and sophisticated configuration primarily designed to support India’s special operations requirement. Equipped with an Infrared Detection Set (IDS), the aircraft can perform precision low-level flying, airdrops and landing in blackout conditions. Self-protection systems and other features are included to ensure aircraft survivability in hostile air defense environments. The aircraft also is equipped with air-to-air receiver refueling capabilityfor extended range operations.

The C-130J is ideally suited to India’s mission environment, which often involves operating out of austere, high-elevation airstrips in hot conditions. The C-130J is powered by four Rolls Royce AE2100 engines and Dowty six bladed props which provide the aircraft with a great deal of power. The C-130J has been operated for the past several years in the mountainous areas of Afghanistan in conditions similar to India and performed exceptionally well.

Photo Courtesy Lockheed-Martin

12 comments :

Anonymous said...

Second LCH prototype by AeroIndia 2011

http://angle-of-attack.blogspot.com/2010/12/second-lch-prototype-by-aeroindia-2011.html

Anonymous said...

Congrats to IAF!! But what about the various systems that will be removed? is it worth with those system removed?

Anonymous said...

i am sure it's a new beginning in terms of technology , for our air force ,which handled soviet era a/c all these years.Good luck!!!

Anonymous said...

So first 3 years easy spying by US techi's???

Mr. Ra said...

Good and I hope that India will be allowed to develop or purchase and install the remnant desired systems.

kimran said...

Where is the mid air refuelling probe??

Anonymous said...

Great news. We need another 44 birds to have an inventory of 50. But most probably will settle for 18.

keshto said...

Where is the mid air refuelling probe??

The beast already flies some 5.500 KM, it can halt and refuel from any airport, its not a fighter whose permission would be denied. So why mid air refueling panga?

Rajan said...

We should buy An-225 from Ukriane. Only 1is operational right now (it flew Delhi Metro's compartments from Korea to Delhi). Many An-225 are grounded because of financial troubles. They can take C-130s as a cargo. :-)

Kuljeet Singh said...

Is it C-130J or C-130J-30 ? Please clarify as news reports say C-30J-30 whereas the fuselage in the photograph says C-130J...

Anonymous said...

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Martin_C-130J_Super_Hercules

India pays USD 1.04 Billion for Six planes

Canada pays USD 1.4 Billion for Seventeen.. yes.. 17.. sataraah..

Yaaron itna bhi mat looto desh ko!

Anonymous said...

This is not the first time the IAF has flown the C130. In the late 1980s Indira Gandhi tasked the IAF to establish an airline with Dakshin Gangotri in Antartica. A hand picked team of IAF personnel trained in Argentina for 2 months ( the actual course at the time was 6 months) and carried out a prooving flight from Argentina's southernmost island base and back non stop. Surprisingly this mission has never been given its due. The IAF crew flew with an Argentinian crew and successfully completed this mission.